Sociology

Sociology is an excellent complement to other subjects in social sciences and humanities, such as Psychology, Politics, History and Geography but also works well with sciences. A challenging, current and relevant subject with great results. Find out more by contacting Ms Parker. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The GCSE in Sociology is designed to be a general course. The Subject Content is divided intosections that deal with particular kinds of social relations or with different aspects of the social structure of British society. Pupils should appreciate that Sociology is not a subject that can be understood in terms of isolated areas. Each section of the specification is connected and interrelated and candidates would benefit from gaining a proper appreciation of more than one section in order to develop their understanding.

Pupils will develop their analytical, assimilation and communication skills by comparing and contrasting perspectives on a variety of social issues, constructing reasoned arguments, making substantiated judgements and drawing reasoned conclusions. By studying sociology, pupils will develop transferable skills including how to:

Investigate facts and make deductions
Develop opinions and new ideas on social issues
Analyse and better understand the social world

PROGRESSION ROUTES

This specification has been developed to enable a smooth progression to GCE Sociology, so pupils who do this GCSE Sociology specification will be well prepared when moving on to AS and A Level Sociology, along with health and social care and the full range of humanities subjects offered.

ASSESSMENT

Exam
What is assessed Weighting Questions

Paper 1 The sociology of families and education

The sociology of families 
The sociology of education 
Relevant areas of social theory and methodology

 50%

(100 marks) Section A has two multiple choice questions followed by a range of short and extended responses.

Section B has two multiple choice questions followed by a range of short and extended responses.

Paper 2 The sociology of crime and deviance and social stratification

The sociology of crime and deviance 
The sociology of social stratification 
Relevant areas of social theory and methodology

50%
(100 marks) Section A has two multiple choice questions followed by a range of short and extended responses.

Section B has two multiple choice questions followed by a range of short and extended responses

Year 9: Pupils are introduced to Sociology as a discipline where they learnkey concepts, sociological methods and skills to examine the ways society influences us and shapes our daily lives. They learn key concepts such as norms, values, socialisation, identity and culture. Topics of the family, education, social stratification, crime andresearch methods employed by sociologistsare studied as well as current trends. They learn the basics of sociological perspectives such as Marxism, functionalism and feminism and how to apply these ideas to the issues. A ‘hands on,’ collaborative learning is applied where pupils take on the role of sociologists by conductingtheir ownpieces of research in these areas.

Year 10: Pupils develop knowledge and understanding of social theory and the skill of critically analysing how issues have been interpreted by sociologists including key thinkers such as Durkheim, Karl Marx and Ann Oakley. Topics covered are those in Paper 1 including; the sociological approach – conflict versus consensus, different sociological perspectives (functionalism, Marxism, feminism and interactionism), Research Methods and the methodological issues (eg: qualitative vs quantitative); The Family - functions, forms and trends in families and Education - educational achievement, subcultures and the relationship with capitalism.

Year 11: Pupils will have completed 50% of the course in Year 10 and will have developed a solid understanding of theory and methods which can be applied to the topics for Paper 2 including; Crime and Deviance - the social construction of crime and deviance, social control, and patterns of crime; Power and social stratification; social class, life chances, poverty as a social issues, power and authority including how power relationships are affected by factors such as class, age, disability, gender and ethnicity. Sociological research methods are revisited and applied to these topics where practical, ethical and theoretical considerations are explored.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION


This course offers an engaging and effective introduction to Sociology. Students will learn the fundamentals of the subject and develop skills valued by higher education (HE) and employers, including critical analysis, independent thinking and research. They acquire the knowledge and understanding of central aspects of sociological thought and methods, together with the application of a range of skills.

Sociological themes, such as socialisation, culture and identity, and social differentiation, power and stratification run throughout.Students can take the AS Level at the end of year 12 or take the full A Level at the end of year 13.


PROGRESSION ROUTES


This course appeals to a cross-section of students, regardless of whether they have studied the subject before. They build on skills developed in the sciences and humanities, and enable progression into a wide range of other subjects.

ASSESSMENT – AS LEVEL

Exam
What is assessed Weighting Questions


Paper 1

Education with Methods in Context

 

50%
(60 marks)


Paper 2
Research Methods with Topics in Sociology (Culture and Identity)

50%
(60 marks)


Year 12
Pupils are introduced to Sociology as a discipline where they learn key concepts, sociological methods and skills to examine the ways society influences us and shapes our daily lives. Research Methods are covered for questions in both papers and include; quantitative and qualitative methods; research design, sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics, the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’, the theoretical, practical and ethical issues.

Paper 1–Education; the role and functions of education, educational achievement by social class, gender and ethnicity, teacher/pupil relationships, pupil identities and subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning, the significance of educational policies, including of selection, marketisation and privatisation.

Paper 2 – Culture and Identity; different conceptions of culture, including subculture, mass culture, folk culture, high and low culture, popular culture and global culture; the socialisation process, the self, identity and difference, the relationship of identity to age, disability, ethnicity, gender, nationality, sexuality and social class in contemporary society, the relationship of identity to production, consumption and globalisation.

ASSESSMENT – A LEVEL

Exam
What is assessed Weighting Questions


Paper 1

Education with Methods in Context


33.3%
(80 marks)


Paper 2
Topics in Sociology; Culture and Identity and Beliefs in Society

33.3%
(80 marks)

Paper 3
Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods
33.3%
(80 marks)


Year 13
Pupils will have covered the content for Paper 1 and one topic in Paper 2 in their first year. They will continue their A Level by learning the second topic for Paper 2 and start the full course for Paper 3.

Paper 2 - Beliefs in Society; ideology, science and religion, ,the relationship between social change and social stability, religious organisations, including cults and sects, the relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices, the significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, and globalisation and the spread of religions.

Paper 3–Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods; the social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes, crime control, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system, conflict, structural and social action theories, the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory, the nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific, the relationship between theory and methods, debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom, the relationship between Sociology and social policy.

 
 
 

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